Low-income families seldom get access to personal transport. A lot of TANF recipients don’t cars that are own.

Low-income families seldom get access to personal transport. A lot of TANF recipients don’t cars that are own.

A 1998 General Accounting workplace research stated that not as much as six % of welfare recipients had automobiles in 1995. (17) This estimate is frequently viewed as low. One reason is welfare guidelines concerning vehicles had been more restrictive during those times; less recipients could actually possess vehicles. An additional research, scientists did in-depth interviews with welfare recipients and discovered that between 20 and 40 per cent owned cars. (18) vehicle access is certainly not entirely an issue for welfare recipients, however for a wider band of low-income families too. Based on an analysis associated with the 1995 nationwide private Transportation Survey (the latest information available), 36 % of low-income solitary moms and dads don’t have an automobile while just four % of center- and upper-income families lack an automobile. When low-income families do acquire an automobile, it is a mature, cheaper model that is unreliable and often looking for repairs. (19)

Some state studies of previous welfare recipients examine car access being a barrier to employment.

  • In a University of Michigan research, nearly 50 % of the welfare recipients into the extensive research test experienced a transport barrier, thought as lacking a car or truck and/or a driver’s license.