‘Sex Slaves’ Or ‘sex Workers’? Cross-cultural and relative spiritual views on sex, Subjectivity, and Moral Identity in Anti-sex Trafficking Discourse

‘Sex Slaves’ Or ‘sex Workers’? Cross-cultural and relative spiritual views on sex, Subjectivity, and Moral Identity in Anti-sex Trafficking Discourse

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The international trafficking in females and kids (primarily girls) for prostitution and intercourse work is now a multi-billion buck industry in present years, particularly in elements of Southern and Southeast Asia. Despite their typical objective to eradicate or diminish the intercourse trafficking industry and help the victims, the various entities involved with anti-sex trafficking efforts have sharply disagreed about many different dilemmas, including a fundamental concept of intercourse trafficking plus the appropriate techniques for fighting it. In this specific article, We examine one main part of disagreement, which revolves across the dilemma of the morality of prostitution as well as other types of commercial intercourse work. This dilemma brings along with it divergent, also antithetical, views regarding ladies’ sex functions, self-identity and agency that is moral regards to intercourse work. I reveal the way the spiritual proportions of the problem were inadequately dealt with by showing how anti-trafficking discourse is devoid of non-Western spiritual views. Since Thailand happens to be the centre for intercourse trafficking plus the commercial intercourse industry within the Asia-Pacific region, where in fact the percentage that is greatest of intercourse trafficking happens, this short article will talk about Thai Buddhist views to illustrate how a anti-sex trafficking discourse has ignored social variations in its analysis.